Monday, September 27, 2010

Banned Books Week is this week.

Yes, there is a celebration for practically every month, week and day, but the library seems to be particularly suited to celebrate this week's theme.

Banned Books Week (Sept. 25-Oct. 2, 2010) advocates the freedom to read. It began in 1982 in response to the increasing number of challenges received by libraries (and other book providers) over books thought to be too explicit, too racially charged, too inappropriate for children or young adults, or too positive in their treatment of homosexuals. Since that time, over a thousand books have been the subject of debate, and some have been challenged repeatedly (http://www.bannedbooksweek.org/info.html).

Challenged books include more recent titles like Twilight, but also include seminal works of literature such as To Kill a Mockingbird and the Color Purple.

The American Library Association compiles lists of the most frequently challenged books. If you're interested in reading any of these titles, the library has the following (in order of the number of challenges):

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J. K. Rowling
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier
Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
Slaughterhouse-five by Kurt Vonnegut
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
Black Boy by Richard Wright
The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende

So check out a book or two and celebrate the freedom to read!

Thursday, September 23, 2010

September is Library Card Sign-up Month...

So what better way to celebrate than by checking out books, and we have plenty of new ones that have just been added to the collection. The best part is, you don't even need a card at the Jessup Library. As a currently-enrolled student, you automatically have an account. All you need to know is your student ID number or your MyPVCC login. The same goes for faculty and staff; you are also in our system, but you don't even need to know your EmplID. We can look you up by name! So take a minute or two to peruse our latest additions, then stop by. Remember, no card needed!

And here are a few teasers to peak your interest. We have:

Stunning art books -- Oceania: Art of the Pacific Islands in the Metropolitan Museum of Art; Masterpieces of European Painting, 1800-1920, in the Metropolitan Museum of Art; Piero di Cosimo: Visions Beautiful and Strange; Silk; or, Vitebsk: The Life of Art.

Intriguing biographies -- Belva Lockwood: The Woman Who Would Be President; The Cynical Idealist: A Spiritual Biography of John Lennon; or, Hanging Captain Gordon: The Life and Trial of an American Slave Trader.

Incredible fiction -- The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie (Take a look at Mary Jane King's riveting review of this book.); Orpheus Lost: A Novel; or, Animal's People.

Fascinating historical accounts -- Justinian's Flea: Plague, Empire and the Birth of Europe; Life and Death in the Third Reich; Retribution: The Battle for Japan, 1944-45; or, So Help Me God: The Founding Fathers and the First Great Battle Over Church and State.

Helpful how-to's -- Dealing with Debt; Work, Life and Family Imbalance: How to Level the Playing Field; or, Your Rights as a Tenant.

And scientific wonders -- Deadly Companions: How Microbes Shaped Our History; The Genius Engine: Where Memory, Reason, Passion, Violence and Creativity Intersect in the Human Brain; or, Sex Sleep Eat Drink Dream: A Day in the Life of Your Body.

Of course we have many more. So take a look at our full list. Remember, students can check out up to 25 books at a time; so no worries if you're interested in more than one. In fact, we highly encourage it!

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

September is Hispanic Heritage Month


What do these people have in common? Each of them are Hispanic American and possesses great talent that has influenced United States culture and society. And they are but a sampling of the many Hispanic Americans who have had a profound effect. Join us as we celebrate their accomplishments during Hispanic Heritage Month by checking out a few books.

For general background and biographical information, try:

100 Hispanics You Should Know by Ivan Castro (This is a NetLibrary book. To access this book from off campus, you'll need to create a free account while on campus first.)

Artists from Latin American Cultures: A Biographical Dictionary by Kristin Congdon and Kara Kelley Hallmark.

Encyclopedia of Latin American Theater
Notable Latino Americans: A Biographical Dictionary by Matt S. Meier

*Want more, then try the following search strategy in our catalog: (hispanic OR latin OR mexican OR chican*) AND (america* OR "united states") AND biography

For information on history and culture, try:

The Cambridge Companion to Modern Latin American Culture edited by John King

Mestizaje: Critical Uses of Race in Chicano culture

*A catalog search for: (hispanic OR latin OR mexican OR chican*) AND (america* OR "united states") AND (history OR culture) also will yield many more results.

For information on and collections of literature and poetry, try:

Bordering Fires: The Vintage Book of Contemporary Mexican and Chicano/a Literature

Daughters of the Fifth Sun: A Collection of Latina Fiction and Poetry

Oxford Book of Latin American Poetry: A Bilingual Anthology

Your Brain on Latino Comics: from Gus Arriola to Los Bros Hernandez by Frederick Luis Aldama (This is a NetLibrary book. To access this book from off campus, you'll need to create a free account while on campus first.)

*To find additional titles in our collection on this topic, try searching our catalog for: (hispanic OR latin OR mexican OR chican*) AND (america* OR "united states) AND (literature OR poetry)

This is just a sample of the many items we have on Hispanic American culture. We hope you will find one of these of interest! And as always, please let us know if you have any questions.

Friday, September 10, 2010

Three new databases make research easy!

The library staff is pleased to announce the addition of three new electronic resources to the collection!

APA PsycNET is a combination of databases, including PsycArticles and PyscINFO, that contains citations, abstracts and full-text scholarly journal articles on psychology and behavioral science. Also included are book chapters, full-text books and APA's Encyclopedia of Psychology.

Gale Science Resource Center offers a variety of information on science topics in the form of scholarly journal, newspaper and reference articles, multimedia clips and images. This database is an excellent resource for any science course, and even provides sample experiments with instructions. This resource also would work well for any pick-your-own-topic assignment, such as those given in English 111 and Public Speaking.

ProQuest Dissertations and Theses provides access to citations and full-text dissertations and theses on a variety of topics. This new resource may be especially helpful to faculty looking for comprehensive research.

All of these resources can be accessed both on and off campus by students, faculty and staff.

We hope you will find these new databases helpful, and please keep in mind that we are always here to help if you have trouble. So give us a call; we'll be glad to walk your though it.

Thursday, September 9, 2010

A new semester brings new books

The library has been hard at work adding new books to the collection--just in time for the beginning of the sememster. Before the rush of papers begins, take a look at a few of our new titles. They might prove to be a nice diversion or just the book you need for your research.

Find out how apes, our evolutionary cousins, provide insight into human nature in Our Inner Ape: A Leading Primatologist Explains Why We Are Who We Are.

Pollen: The Hidden Sexuality of Flowers is a beautiful photographic journey of the pollen grain and its importance.

If you can't remember where you put your keys, then Can't Remember What I Forgot: The Good News From the Front Lines of Memory Research may make you feel better.

Watercolour for the Absolute Beginner offers step-by-step instructions for the tentative painter who never thought he/she could paint.

The Switch portrays a single woman ready to have kids on her own. It drew national attention when Bill O'Reilly made a comment about single motherhood. Find out the true story of why single women are choosing to have children in Single by Chance, Mothers by Choice: How Women Are Choosing Parenthood Without Marriage and Creating the New American Family.

Fascinated by the Knights Templar, then check out God’s Warriors: Knights Templar, Saracens and the Battle for Jerusalem.

Are you a philosopher at heart? Burning to know the answers to life's deepest questions? Then try What Would Socrates Say?: Philosophers Answer Your Questions About Love, Nothingness, and Everything Else

"Flattery will get you everywhere," according to Mae West. So you may want to read up on it in Willis Goth Regier's In Praise of Flattery.

Are you transferring and need to take the SAT? Well, we have study materials for that as well. Peterson's Master the SAT 2010.

And for all you nurses out there--how about the NCLEX? We've got several new titles that will help you prepare.
NCLEX-RN Excel: Test Success Through Unfolding Case Study Review
NCLEX-RN Review Made Incredibly Easy!
NCLEX-RN Exam Cram


The new books list will give you all of the titles in this group. Happy exploring! And if you need any help, please let us know!