Tuesday, February 28, 2017

The Votes Are In: One Book 2017 Winner

The people have spoken, and the results are in: we have our winning One Book for Fall 2017!

Three books entered the gladiator's pit: Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly, which tells the story of four African-American women who worked for NASA as human computers from World War II through the Space Race;  Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance, a debut memoir that explores the author's life growing up in the white underclass; and It Can't Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis, a political satire about the rise of a fascist government in the United States. They're all great stories and relevant to current events -- but in the end, only one book could prevail.

And that one book, receiving a total of 251 votes out of a total of 412, was Hidden Figures.


Eager to start reading? Copies are available for students starting on Club Day, September 2017. If you're teaching faculty, drop by the library for your copy today. In the meantime, whet your interest with these reviews and articles:

New York Times review
Review from the Los Angeles Review of Books
Article from Smithsonian.com

Thanks so much for voting!

Friday, February 3, 2017

Fall In Love With A New Book

Whatever the state of your New Year's resolutions (abandoned, going strong, or nonexistent), it's never too late in the year to try something new -- like a book (hint, hint). Our latest crop of new books is in. Here are some recommendations to get you started:

Travel through America's culinary landscape in The Mad Feast: An Ecstatic Tour through America's Food by Matthew Gavin Frank. Alternately, climb into a culinary time machine in A History of Food in 100 Recipes by William Sitwell.

Love it or hate it, Valentine's Day is a fact of February. Anatomy of Love: A Natural History of Mating, Marriage, and Why We Stray by Helen E. Fisher brings a sociological lens to romantic love, and Sex in the Sea: Our Intimate Connection with Sex-Changing Fish, Romantic Lobsters, Kinky Squid, and Other Salty Erotica of the Deep kicks humans out of the equation altogether.

January may be over, but if there's room in your life for a new project or a bit of sprucing up, we've got books on personal finances (check out How to Retire with Enough Money: And How to Know What Is Enough by Teresa Ghilarducci and The Index Card: Why Personal Finance Doesn't Have to be Complicated by Helaine Olen), entrepreneurship (check out We-Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate, and Succeed in the Sharing Economy), or feeling good and on top of the world (check out The Urban Monk: Eastern Wisdom and Modern Hacks to Stop Time and Find Success, Happiness, and Peace by Pedram Shojai, The Confidence Effect: Every Woman's Guide to the Attitude that Attract Success by Grace Killelea, or The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success by Emma Seppala).

Celebrate Black History month by reading about the musical legacy of the Godfather of Soul in The One: The Life and Music of James Brown by R. L. Smith, or about the friendship between First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and African-American writer-turned-activist, Pauli Murray, in The Firebrand and the First Lady: Portrait of a Friendship: Pauli Murray, Eleanor Roosevelt, and the Struggle for Social Justice by Patricia Bell-Scott. Renowned activist and scholar Angela Y. Davis writes about past liberation struggles and how they inform our current fight for human liberation in Freedom is a Constant Struggle: Ferguson, Palestine, and the Foundation of a Movement. And in Salvage the Bones, by Jesymn Ward, a family in Mississippi prepares for what will later come to be known as Hurricane Katrina while dealing with their own personal troubles.

Read in public with these eye-catching titles: When Hitler Took Cocaine and Lenin Lost His Brain: History's Unknown Chapters by Giles Milton is a collection of weird tales from history worthy of Ripley's Believe It or Not, and A Thousand Naked Strangers: A Paramedic's Wild Ride to the Edge and Back plunges readers into the grisly work of an EMT.

You can find all these books and more in our catalog.